Rebecca Bagwell1

F, b. circa 1642, d. after 28 June 1658
Birth*circa 1642Rebecca Bagwell was born circa 1642 at Accomac County, Virginia
She was the daughter of Henery Bagwell and Alice Hawkins.2 
Birthcirca 1646Rebecca Bagwell was born circa 1646 at Matomkin, Northampton County, Virginia
Marriage*She married Robert Andrews.  
Death*after 28 June 1658Rebecca Bagwell died after 28 June 1658 at Northampton County, Virginia
Deathbefore 28 June 1658She died before 28 June 1658.1 
Deathcirca 28 June 1658She died circa 28 June 1658 at Northampton County, Virginia
Married NameHer married name was Andrews. 
Married Nameafter 20 April 1657 As of after 20 April 1657,her married name was Fisher. 

Family 1

Robert Andrews d. b 1657
Marriage*She married Robert Andrews.  

Family 2

(?) Fisher Stepen
Child 1.Rebecca Fisher

Citations

  1. [S46] Unknown author, Main.FTW, Date of Import: Jun 25, 2003.
  2. [S496] Historic James Town - Henery Bagwell, online www.historic jamestowne.org.

Daniel Woolf

M, b. 5 March 1772
Birth*5 March 1772Daniel Woolf was born on 5 March 1772. 
He was the son of Reece Woolf and Mary White
Marriage*19 July 1795Daniel Woolf married, at age 23, Nancy Ball Milby on Sunday, 19 July 1795 at Sussex County, Delaware
(Heir) Will8 May 1785Daniel Woolf was named an heir in the will of Francis Woolf dated 8 May 1785 at Sussex County, Delaware.1 
(Heir) Will17 April 1797Daniel Woolf was named an heir in the will of Reece Woolf dated 17 April 1797 at Sussex County, Delaware.2 
(Heir & Executor) Will1 October 1798Daniel Woolf was named executor and an heir in the will of Mary White dated 1 October 1798 at Lewes & Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware.3 

Census

YearDatePlace
Cens18106 August 1810Sussex County, Delaware4

Family

Nancy Ball Milby
Marriage*19 July 1795Daniel Woolf married, at age 23, Nancy Ball Milby on Sunday, 19 July 1795 at Sussex County, Delaware
Children 1.Reece Woolf b. 22 Sep 1802
 2.Daniel Woolf b. 7 Oct 1806
 3.John Woolf b. 24 Mar 1824

Citations

  1. [S667] Ancestry.com. Francis Wolfe, Sussex County, Delaware Probate Records, 1680-1800 [DATABASE ON-LINE], accessed on June 18, 2013. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.
  2. [S670] Ancestry.com. Reece Wolfe, Sussex County, Delaware Probate Records, 1680-1800 [DATABASE ON-LINE], accessed on June 18, 2013. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.
  3. [S671] Ancestry.com. Mary Wolfe, Sussex County, Delaware Probate Records, 1680-1800 [DATABASE ON-LINE], accessed on June 18, 2013. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.
  4. [S112] 1810 U.S. Census, Sussex County, Delaware, pop. sch., Dan'l Woolf.

Thomas Stratton

M, d. 29 May 1596
Death*29 May 1596Thomas Stratton died on 29 May 1596. 

Family

Dorothy (?)
Child 1.(?) Stratton

Captain Thomas Graves1

M, b. before 1 April 1584, d. November 1635
Birth*before 1 April 1584Captain Thomas Graves was born before 1 April 1584 at Berkshire, England.2 
Christening1 April 1584He was christened on 1 April 1584 at Lanborne, Berkshire, England.2 
He was the son of Thomas Graves and Joan Blagrove.2 
Birth9 February 1587Captain Thomas Graves was born on 9 February 1587 at Leeds, Yorkshire County, England.1 
Marriage*1610He married Katherine Crosher, daughter of Joseph Crosher, in 1610 at Berkshire County, England
Marriage1610Captain Thomas Graves married Katherine Crosher, daughter of Joseph Crosher, in 1610 at Accomack County, Virginia.2 
Death*November 1635Captain Thomas Graves died in November 1635 at Accomack County, Virginia.1 
Note*He WFT 701-1465

WFT 786 - 0355

There is much written about Thomas Graves and his descendants by Wm. Montgomery Sweeny. Small excerpts follow. Capt. Graves was given 100 acres of land by a court held by the London Co. of Virginia in London, England on 11/20/1622, for transporting people to the colonies of America. He arrived in Jamestown, VA in the "Mary & Margaret" in Oct. 1608. He is listed among those arriving in the second supply to the colony.

His wife, Katherine, came from England with their two sons after 1617.

Capt. Thomas Graves was an "ancient planter" of VA, a member of the Virginia Company. He represented Smythe's Hundred in 1619 at the first constitutional convention in America. they met at Jamestown, VA on July 30, 1619.

Thomas Graves was once captured by Indians and taken to Opechancanough's town. He was finally rescued by Capt. John Smith.

---------------

"Captain Thomas Graves was a member of the Virginia Company. He came to Virginia in the Mary and Margaret and is listed as arriving in the Second Supply.
Shortly after his arrival while on an exploring expedition he was taken captive by the Indians who held him in Opecananough's town subject to an uncertain fate
when a timely rescue was effected by Ensign Thomas Savage.

An undated letter from Governor Yeardley to Sir Edwin Sandys concerning
Smythe's (Southhampton) Hundred, written after 29 April 1619 recites circumstances of the affair between Captain William Eppes, Commander and Captain Stallins in which the latter was slain and the former placed under arrest, and states "I have entreated Captain Graves, an Ancient Officer of this company to take charge of the people and the workes. Capatin Graves was sent as one of two representatives from Smythe's Hundred to the first Representative Legislatiuve Assembly which convened at Jamestowne 30 July 1619.

As a member of the Virginia Company Captain Graves had agreed to transport 100 persons to Virginia and accordingly was allowed a patent for land 20 November 1622. His grant for 200 acres on the eastern shore of the Bay of the Chesapeake and abutting the southerly side of Capatin Henry Fleete is of record 14 March 1628/29 and recites that the land was due him by virtue of an adventure of 25 Pounds paid to Sir Thomas Smith late treasurer for the Company of Virginia.

Captain Graves referred to as Esquire in the Accomack- Northampton County court records was appointed Commander of the Plantation of Accomack by the General Court 08 February 1627/28 and headed the list of Commissioners as the first extant court of record held for Accomack 07 January 1633/34. He served as Burgess to the Assembly 1630 and 1632 and as a member of the first vestry of the Parish, 14 September 1635. His death occurred between November 1635 when he was a witness to a deed and 05 January 1635/36 when suit was entered against a servant to Mrs. Graves.

Thomas Graves married Katherine who with his two sons came to Virginia after 1616 as is shown in a patent granted to John 09 August 1637 reciting that the 600 acres granted to him in Elizabeth City was due... in Right of descent from his father Thomas Graves who transported at his owne proper costs himself, Katherine Graves his wife, John Graves the pattentee and Thomas Graves, Jr. and eight persons.

Mrs. Graves was living at the old Plantation 20 May 1636."


The above is taken from the
Adventurers of Purse and Person, 1987, Page 326.

-------


Capt. Thomas Graves Thomas Graves is a multiple great grandfather of Robert Beauchamp. Thomas Graves, gentleman, arrived in Virginia in October of 1608, coming from England in the ship "Mary and Margaret" with Captain Christopher Newport's second supply. Although John Card Graves (R-515) states that Thomas was accompanied by his wife Katherine, sons John and Thomas, and eight others, including Henry Singleton and Thomas Edge, most other historians agree that he did not bring his wife and children over until later. It is likely that he did not even marry Katherine until 1610, and his first child was born about 1611.

Thomas Graves was one of the original Adventurers (stockholders) of the Virginia Company of London, and one of the very early Planters (settlers) who founded Jamestown, Virginia, the first permanent English settlement in North America. He was also the first known person named Graves in North America. Captain Thomas Graves is listed as one of the original Adventurers as "Thomas Grave" on page 364, Records of the Virginia Company of London, vol. IV. Although the Records of the Virginia Company state that in 1622 was granted "a patent to Thomas Graves of Doublin in the Realm of Ireland, gent.", this may be a clerical error. As stated in the original charter of the Virginia Co. of London, the first Adventurers to Virginia were to be from the city of London.

In 1606 the name Virginia designated the North American coast north of Spanish Florida. The First Colony was to "begin their first plantation and place of their first sojourning and dwelling in any place along the aforesaid coast of Virginia or America where they thought it suitable and convenient, between the aforesaid thirty-four and forty-one degrees of the aforesaid latitude." The Second Colony was to locate at some point between thirty-eight degrees and forty-five degrees of northern latitude. (Rec. Va. Co., vol. IV, p. 368).

On May 13, 1607, Captain Christopher Newport's fleet of three small ships, the Susan Constant, the Godspeed and the Discovery, with 105 colonists, reached the site of this first permanent English settlement, and called it James Towne. Captain Newport returned to Jamestown on Jan. 8, 1608 with the first supply in the John and Francis. The Phoenix, commanded by Captain Francis Nelson, which had sailed as part of the first supply, finally arrived on 20 April 1608. More than half the settlers died that first winter.

Captain Newport sailed again for England and arrived at Blackwell May 21, 1608. Capt. Nelson returned to England in the Phoenix early in July 1608, with requests from Virginia to be sent by the second supply. Capt. Newport left England in the Mary and Margaret, a ship of about 150 tons, with the second supply, probably in August of 1608. Many sources give the arrival date of this second supply as being early in October 1608. We do know that it was after Sept. 10, 1608.

A comparatively complete record, with the names, of the little band of first planters who came in 1607 and the two supplies of 1608 is given by Captain John Smith in his Historie. These three expeditions brought a total of about 295 people -- the first settlers numbering about 105, the first supply 120, and the second supply about 70. Of the whole number, 92 are described as "gentlemen."

Regarding the title of "Captain" which is attached to Thomas Graves in Virginia historical records, he had no such designation in the Charter of 1609 wherein all the Adventurers (stockholders) of the Virginia Company are listed, and is shown by Captain John Smith on his arrival in Virginia simply as "Thomas Graves, Gent." Thus it appears that he acquired the title of Captain after arriving in Virginia.

Thomas Graves early became active in the affairs of the infant colony. On an exploring expedition he was captured by the Indians and taken to Opechancanough. Thomas Savage, who had come to Virginia with the first supply on the John and Francis in 1608, was sent to rescue him, in which he was successful.

The winter of 1608-09 was much better than the previous winter, but soon after Capt. John Smith returned to England for medical treatment in October 1609, the "Starving Time" reduced the population of about 500 to no more than sixty men, women, and children. In June of 1610, the survivors were in the process of abandoning the settlement, when Lord Delaware arrived as governor of the colony. From that time on, there was apparently no further serious thought of abandoning the town. However, even by 1616, the colony had a total population of only 351, of whom 81 were farmers or tenants.

In 1617 the Virginia Company, hoping to expand population and agricultural production in the colony, encouraged private or voluntary associations organized on a joint stock basis to establish settlements in the area of the Company's patent. The Society of Smith's (or Smythe's) Hundred (later called Southampton Hundred) was organized in 1617. In addition to Captain Thomas Graves, the Adventurers included Sir Thomas Smith, Sir Edwin Sandys, and the Earl of Southampton. Soon after April 29, 1619, Governor Yeardley wrote to Sir Edwin Sandys: "I have entreated Capt. Graves, an antient officer of this company, to take charge of the people and workes."

Capt. Thomas Graves was a member of the First Legislative Assembly in America, and, with Mr. Walter Shelley, sat for Smythe's Hundred when they met at Jamestown on July 30, 1619. The time of Capt. Thomas Graves' removal to the Eastern Shore is not known. It was, however, after August 1619, since he was then a representative from Smythe's Hundred to the first meeting of the House of Burgesses. It was also prior to Feb. 16, 1623, for "A List of Names: of the Living in Virginia, Feb. 16, 1623" shows Thomas Graves "at the Eastern Shore". His patent for 200 acres on the Eastern Shore is of record 14 March 1628 (Patent Book No. 1, p. 72, Land Registrar's Office, Richmond, Va.). This land was in what was then known as Accomack, now a part of Northampton Co. It was granted by Dr. Thomas Pott, Governor of Virginia, and was on the eastern side of the Bay of Chesapeake, westerly of the lands of Capt. Henry Flute, an explorer of the Bay, "by virtue of the adventure of five and twenty pounds paid by the said Capt. Thomas Graves to Sir Thomas Smyth, Treasurer of the Virginia Company." He paid a "quit rent" of one shilling for fifty acres, payable at the feast of St. Michael the Archangel (Sept. 29) each year on a part of his land.

In the census of February 1625, Capt. Thomas Graves was one of only 51 people then living on the Eastern Shore. He was put in charge of the direction of local affairs later in 1625. In Sept. 1632 he, with others, was appointed a Commissioner "for the Plantacon of Acchawmacke". He was one of the Burgesses to the Assembly, representing Accomac, for the 1629-30 session and the 1632 session. He attended many of the meetings of the Commissioners, but he was absent from Dec. 30, 1632/3 until Oct. 23, 1633/4. It appears that he was out of the country.

The old Hungars Episcopal Church is located about seven miles north of Eastville, on the north side of Hungars Creek. Hungars Parish was made soon after the county was established, and the first minister was Rev. Francis Bolton, who was succeeded by Rev. William Cotton. The first vestry was appointed in 1635. The first vestry meeting was on Sept. 29, 1635, at which Capt. Thomas Graves headed the list of those present. The first church edifice was erected in 1690-95 and was still standing around 1900, one of the oldest churches in the country. In addition to Capt. Thomas Graves, the other persons named by the court as vestrymen of Hungars Church were William Cotton, minister, Obedience Robins, John Howe, William Stone (first Protestant Governor of Maryland), William Burdett, William Andrews, John Wilkins, Alexander Mountray, Edward Drews, William Benjiman and Stephen Charlton.

Captain Thomas Graves died between November 1635 when he was witness to a deed and 5 Jan. 1636 when suit was entered against a servant to Mrs. Graves (Adventurers of Purse and Person, pp. 188-189). His birth date is not known, but is believed to be about 1580. That would have made him only about 55 years of age at his death.

Very little is known about Katherine, wife of Capt. Thomas Graves. Her maiden name may have been Croshaw. (There was a Raleigh Chroshaw, Gent., who arrived with the second supply with Thomas Graves.) Just when she came to Virginia is not recorded. She and her children are not included in the 1625 census of the Eastern Shore, although Capt. Thomas Graves is. The patent granted to John Graves (son of Capt. Thomas Graves) on Aug. 9, 1637 states that the 600 acres granted to him in Elizabeth City was "due in right of descent from his father Thomas Graves, who transported at his own cost himself, Katherine Graves his wife, John Graves the patentee, and Thomas Graves, Jr., and 8 persons." (Cavaliers and Pioneers, Nugent.) The 50 acres assigned for each person transported shows they came after 1616.

The other 8 persons transported did not include any members of Capt. Graves' family. The girls, Ann, Verlinda, and Katherine obviously came later, and Francis was born in Virginia. The last reference to Mrs. Graves shows her living at the Old Plantation, Accomac, as of May 20, 1636.

Since Captain Thomas Graves had been active in the affairs of Virginia from his arrival, the absence of any mention of him during certain periods indicate he had returned to England. This is also confirmed by patents issued to him and to others in which he is mentioned. Mrs. Hiden stated: "Even a cursory reading of Northampton (formerly Accomack) records reveals how frequent were the trips to England, Ireland, Holland, and New England" of those living on the Eastern Shore. Mrs. Hiden also stated (R-509, p. 34): "We know from the land patents that Capt. Thomas Graves made several trips out of the country, to England presumably, and on one of his return voyages his family accompanied him."

Thomas Graves was probably unmarried when he arrived in Virginia in 1608. He was young, and adventure was probably the reason for his coming to Virginia. He was obviously educated, of some "social status" and financial means, and a leader.

It is likely that he returned to England, possibly in Oct. 1609, either on the same ship with Captain John Smith (who left Virginia for England for treatment of his wounds resulting from an explosion), or on one of the other seven ships which arrived in Virginia in August 1609. In that way he would have missed the "Starving Time" of the winter of 1609-10, which so few survived.

He may have then married in England in about 1610, fathered John Graves and Thomas Graves, remained in England for several years, and returned to Virginia prior to the formation of Smythe's Hundred in 1617, or possibly a little later. It is known that he was "entreated to take charge of the people and workes" at Smythe's Hundred in April 1619, and was there then.

Also, there is no record of his being in Virginia after the meeting of the Burgesses in July-August of 1619 until he is shown as living on the Eastern Shore in 1623. It seems reasonable that he was in England at the time of the Indian Massacre of March 1622, and upon returning to Virginia settled on the Eastern Shore where it was less perilous to live. The fact that he fathered three children, the girls, during this period certainly lends support to his being in England. (R-14, R-501, R-515).
 
Emigration*1 October 1608He emigrated on 1 October 1608 from England; on the ship "Mary and Margrett."1 
Residence*1622He lived in 1622 at Accomack County, Virginia.1 

Occupation

Occupation1619Smythe's Hundred, Virginia, was a member of the House of Burgess.1
Occupationbetween 1629/30 and 1632Accomack County, Virginia, member of the House of Burgess1

Family

Katherine Crosher b. c 1590, d. 24 May 1636
Marriage1610Captain Thomas Graves married Katherine Crosher, daughter of Joseph Crosher, in 1610 at Accomack County, Virginia.2 
Marriage*1610Captain Thomas Graves married Katherine Crosher, daughter of Joseph Crosher, in 1610 at Berkshire County, England
Children 1.John Graves1 b. b 1616
 2.Thomas Graves1 b. b 1616
 3.Francis Graves1 b. a 1616
 4.Verlinda Graves1 b. a 1616
 5.Katherine Graves1 b. a 1616
 6.Ann Graves+1 b. 1620, d. 2 Mar 1683/84

Citations

  1. [S497] Historic James Town - Thomas Graves, online www.historic jamestowne.org.
  2. [S68] LDS Church, www.familysearch.com.

Robert Porter

M, d. before 1 October 1651
Marriage*Robert Porter married (?) (?).  
Death*before 1 October 1651Robert Porter died before 1 October 1651 at Henrico County, Virginia.1 
Probate*1 October 1651His estate was probated on 1 October 1651 at Henrico County, Virginia.1 

Family

(?) (?) d. b 1688
Children 1.Ann Porter+1 d. c 1711
 2.Robert Porter1 d. 27 Jan 1688/89
 3.Alice Porter1
 4.(?) Porter

Citations

  1. [S161] Artell Brown, "Family History - Artell Brown."

Susan Arnett1

F, b. 1755, d. 13 April 1846
Birth*1755Susan Arnett was born in 1755.2 
She was the daughter of Isaac Arnett and Hannah White.2 
Marriage*5 January 1777Susan Arnett married Shepard Kollock, age 25, son of Shepard Kollock and Mary Goddard, on Sunday, 5 January 1777. 
Marriage1777Susan Arnett married Shepard Kollock, son of Shepard Kollock and Mary Goddard, in 1777.2 
Death*13 April 1846Susan Arnett died on 13 April 1846 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Name Variation Susan Arnett was also known as Susannah Arnett.3 
Married Name5 January 1777 As of 5 January 1777,her married name was Kollock. 

Family

Shepard Kollock b. Sep 1751, d. 28 Jul 1839
Marriage1777She married Shepard Kollock, son of Shepard Kollock and Mary Goddard, in 1777.2 
Marriage*5 January 1777Susan Arnett married Shepard Kollock, age 25, son of Shepard Kollock and Mary Goddard, on Sunday, 5 January 1777. 
Children 1.Lydia Austin Kollock
 2.Susan Davis Kollock
 3.Sarah Howell Kollock
 4.Rev Shepard Kosciusko Kollock
 5.Jane Hay Kollock

Citations

  1. [S45] Daughters of the American Revolution, Lineage Book of the Charter Members of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol 1, 48.
  2. [S45] Daughters of the American Revolution, Lineage Book of the Charter Members of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. 99, 267.
  3. [S45] Daughters of the American Revolution, Lineage Book of the Charter Members of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol 13, 366.